I am happy to announce that I recently received my certification specialty in Childhood Developmental Disorders.  This umbrella includes many childhood challenges including, ADHD, autism, OCD, sensory deprivation disorder, violence, anxiety and dyslexia.  If you know anyone who can be helped with these challenges, please refer them to my office.  I will be able to determine if the child has a deficiency in a specific brain area. If so, my area of passion is to create neuroplastic changes in these problem areas.  I also give homework so that the child and parent have more control as well an ability to support and stabilize the treatment in the office.  I believe I am the only person in the state of Washington that has this certification.  Thank you!

I began treating a woman with multiple sclerosis. Her balance was terrible and she had multiple bruises on her legs and arms from falling. She also had trouble with small motor control. Buttoning a blouse was difficult. She started to notice better balance after 3 weeks and is now in remission. Did she have multiple sclerosis? Yes, she has it. However, just because she has this debilitating disorder does not mean that her function cannot improve. Making neuroplastic change in the brain is always possible!      Dr. Merry

Does anyone remember the elderly gentleman who I'm treating who had the stroke 9 years ago? Well, I'm still treating him twice/week with nice results. A challenge we have is that he is a minimizer. His blood pressure is now 20-30 points lower in the systolic on a regular basis. He no longer chokes on his food. I can also understand him better when he speaks. His family and I all notice these wonderful differences. But, when I ask him if he notices these good things, he usually huffs and grunts, "Not really". A classic minimizer! Today when he came in he said, "Guess what? I think I notice something with all this stuff you're doing. When I was reading scripture last night, I didn't have to close one eye. For the last many years, whenever I read, I start to see double and have to close one eye if I want to continue. Last night was the first time in a very long time I didn't have to do that." He's happy and so am I.

Here is an interesting article I just read regarding how certain eye movements are events of certain specific brain areas:

2017 Dec;222(9):4163-4185. doi: 10.1007/s00429-017-1461-8. Epub 2017 Jun 23.

Delineating function and connectivity of optokinetic hubs in the cerebellum and the brainstem.

Abstract

Optokinetic eye movements are crucial for keeping a stable image on the retina during movements of the head. These eye movements can be differentiated into a cortically generated response (optokinetic look nystagmus) and the highly reflexive optokinetic stare nystagmus, which is controlled by circuits in the brainstem and cerebellum. The contributions of these infratentorial networks and their functional connectivity with the cortical eye fields are still poorly understood in humans. To map ocular motor centres in the cerebellum and brainstem, we studied stare nystagmus using small-field optokinetic stimuli in the horizontal and vertical directions in 22 healthy subjects. We were able to differentiate ocular motor areas of the pontine brainstem and midbrain in vivo for the first time. Direction and velocity-dependent activations were found in the pontine brainstem (nucleus reticularis, tegmenti pontis, and paramedian pontine reticular formation), the uvula, flocculus, and cerebellar tonsils. The ocular motor vermis, on the other hand, responded to constant and accelerating velocity stimulation. Moreover, deactivation patterns depict a governing role for the cerebellar tonsils in ocular motor control. Functional connectivity results of these hubs reveal the close integration of cortico-cerebellar ocular motor and vestibular networks in humans. Adding to the cortical concept of a right-hemispheric predominance for visual-spatial processing, we found a complementary left-sided cerebellar dominance for our ocular motor task. A deeper understanding of the role of the cerebellum and especially the cerebellar tonsils for eye movement control in a clinical context seems vitally important and is now feasible with functional neuroimaging.